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I feel like the fact that most people do not 100% their games, makes me feel like game completion needs to be reworked.

Gamingtodaynews1g - I feel like the fact that most people do not 100% their games, makes me feel like game completion needs to be reworked.
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To a casual player, they'll just play until they don't want to, and not give a single crap about clearing it. To a completionist, they're gonna do what they can to fulfill the game's 100% completion requirement, to feel like they truly got the most out of the game.

I feel this calls for a bit of a rework with how games handle 100% completion.

Here's the thing. For a completionist, the thing that's most important, is that the game tell them that 100% completion percentage. That's where I feel the problem lies, is when the game physically TELLS the player "hey, you've only completed 78% of me". If the story of the game is truly the mark of the end of the game, then the game has absolutely NO business letting you know what percentage of the game you completed. You know what does this does? Nothing for the casual, but makes it a chore for the completionist.

On the other hand, say a game didn't tell you the completion percentage. If the game's not about doing everything in the first place, the only thing that COULD come out of a percentage, is to nag completionists. That's literally it. Remove that percentage from the game alone, and completionists will more than likely no longer feel the need to complete everything under the pretense of doing everything, if it's not contributing to anything anyway. Meanwhile, this won't hurt casual gamers in the slightest.

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That's somewhat where my issue resides. When games publicly show you your "X/30" stat, or your "X%" completion, or a bunch of blank check boxes that turn on when you find them, completionists are naturally gonna want to fill those up, ESPECIALLY if they offer some 100% completion bonus for doing so. Games like Breath of the Wild absolutely DO reward and acknowledge you for getting all of the Korok Seeds (the prize is irrelevant, it's the fact that the game is physically aware that you got them all, and will contribute to a 100% completion counter the game gives you).

I'm not really a completionist myself, but I do know that incomplete stats can be manipulative. If the vast majority of the players aren't even gonna fill the stats, why even include them? By not including them, it hurts the casual gamers in no way, and makes things a ton easier on the completionist. It's way better than the alternative of the game tracking your every stat, offering you stickers for everything you do, and just having to suddenly be "okay" with leaving a game incomplete.

Personally, I feel if completionists end up feeling different toward a game in the part where they're just cleaning up the end bits, then that's a perfectly legit aspect of the game worth criticism. By simply pawning it off on the player for a lack of self control, it's almost like being berated for going after something in the game that it physically went out of its way to implement in the first place. You WILL get rewarded for going after 100% in a ton of games, because if it's so important to make sure players that do end up going after everything don't feel disappointed… well, then it just sounds like 100% completion is an important experience now, isn't it?

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