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A Beginners Guide to Trap Tunnels: A Practical Example (Good Terrain)

FortniteBattleRoyale1 - A Beginners Guide to Trap Tunnels: A Practical Example (Good Terrain)
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Introduction

In this guide I will take you through the process of building trap tunnels for a single objective mission on relatively forgiving terrain. For this example, let's consider this hypothetical objective, represented by the metal 1×1 box.

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Overview of terrain around objective.

The trap tunnels I show here only carry the essential traps to demonstrate the concepts of Damage, Slowing and Recycling in its bare essence. The free walls, floors and ceilings can carry any supplementary trap you like. There is an endless range of other options to build for this kind of situation and I only show one way of approaching this (in future guides I will also show these other styles), so be creative and experiment with some of the concepts shown here 🙂


Terrain Analysis

As noted, this situation can be considered to be fairly forgiving terrain. This is because the irregularities in the terrain make that there are only a handful of entry points to the objective (four to be precise as we will see), while at the same time the irregularities are not so large that we have challenging elevation from which husks can drop down. Assuming that the storm rotates this mission and the husks can come from any direction, the paths I observe are as follows:

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Husk paths.

The solid arrows represent the four clear entry points to the objective I mentioned that we will take care of, and the arrow outlines represent the different paths that flow into these entry points. I will show you the trap tunnels I built to cover the solid arrows in a clockwise manner starting at the top of this overview.


Narrow Path Side

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Narrow path side terrain, before.

This narrow one-tile wide path is easily sealed with a two-tile long tunnel:

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Narrow path side, trapped.

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Narrow path side, view from husk approach.

In the first tile of this tunnel the husks are slowed by the Wooden Floor Spikes and damaged by a Ceiling Gas Trap overhead. As the slowing effect extends for one more tile, the husks have to spend longer under both Ceiling Gas Traps, increasing the chance that they are damaged. Additionally, they spend more time walking in front of the Wall Launcher which can push them all the way back out of the tunnel. As we only need one set of Wooden Floor Spikes at the beginning of the tunnel, we have a free floor at the end to place another damage trap. The triangle wall at the exit is there to extent the path of the husks a little further. Inside the tunnel you can utilise diversions like this in the form of low half walls to lengthen the path husks have to walk, but this comes at the cost of potential clogging of the tunnel, and possibly decreased effectiveness of your Wall Launcher. Therefore I would advise to keep the inside of your tunnels relatively clean.


Flat Terrain Side

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Flat terrain side, before.

This side features a two-tile wide entry point. On the right of that, we see a slightly annoying slope, tangential to the path of the husks. Luckily, the path which this slope grants to the husks is already mostly sealed by the trap tunnel we built for the other side. This shows the importance of the interaction of multiple different trap tunnels, as one can have a major positive effect on the pathing for another tunnel. Lastly, at the left we see a small ramp we also noted in the terrain analysis. As there are two other viable paths within two tiles of this ramp, it is safe to simply close this off. If we build a simple 2×1 trap tunnel at the two-tile wide entry point, we end up with something looking like this:

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Flat terrain side, trapped.

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The 2×1 trap tunnel is basically a modular extension of the concepts used in the first trap tunnel, but now two Wall Launchers work together to push the husks back out of the tunnel in a stepwise manner. Setups like this make very effective repeated use of the few traps they use. Also note the small wall I placed to the right at the corner of the slope; this one is not necessary, but just helps to ensure that husks don't walk into the corner between the tunnels and try to beat through, by subtly guiding them.

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Flat terrain side, view from husk approach.


Map's Edge Side

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Map's edge side, before.

Here we again have a two-tile wide entry point, but we have one very strong extra asset; the edge of the map. We can exploit this feature by focussing on the use of Launchers to push husks off the edge of the map and into the abyss. Always be on the lookout for situations like this, as it is a very powerful tool in your arsenal. Wall Launchers are great for this, but you can also use the Wall Launcher / roof-piece combo shown in the middle. This tunnel has a weak spot at the right side, as husks could slip between the off-times of both the Wall and Floor Launcher. A solution to this would be to add a 1×1 Wall Launcher and Gas Trap module at the exit, as we have seen in the other tunnels.

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Map's edge side, trapped.


Ramp Side

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Ramp side, before.

At this side the most important entry point is the short two-tile wide ramp. For husks spawning at the bottom, this is their only way toward the objective. If husks spawn up the hill to the left of the house, they will pass along the top of this ramp. In the overview image you can see that there is another two-tile wide ramp to the right of this one, but the husks that take this route will be taken care of by trap tunnel at the Map's Edge Side.

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Ramp side, trapped.

The bottom of the ramp is easily trapped with a 1×1 box with Wooden Floor Spikes, a Wall Launcher and a Ceiling Gas Trap. Here I have chosen to close off one tile of the ramp. In general this should be fine, but if husks take an odd path and start attacking the wall instead of passing through the tunnel, you can choose to leave this open and build another identical box to the one shown here, but mirrored. On top of the ramp is where we also cover the husks that might come from the left. We have set up a small gallery with Wooden Floor Spikes, Ceiling Gas Traps and a Wall Launcher which pushes husks off the ledge, forcing them to pass through the box at the bottom again. As low half walls will not block the launching of husks in this case, you have a bit more freedom here to experiment with diversions.


All Trapped Up

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Overview of all tunnels.

Our efforts have resulted in all possible paths that the husks could have taken towards the objective being covered by four trap tunnels. We have used some simple diversions to relieve pressure of challenging entry points and used the terrain to our advantage where possible. Also note the very dense setup that the two first trap tunnels form together, effectively sealing off all unwanted entry points at this sector.

It goes without saying that every situation you will encounter is different from this one, but the approaches used here can be applied modularly; every other map features a one- or two-tile wide ramp, or an edge that begs for husks being thrown off it. Learning to build trap tunnels is a very good example of Trial and Error, so just experiment and learn from doing; I hope to have supplied you with some inspiration for this 🙂

That's it for me.

Have fun, and good luck saving the World!

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