Destiny 2

In Destiny, the Aim Assist stat affects Bullet Magnetism, not Reticle Friction. And mouse has more AA/BM than controller.

destiny2 10 - In Destiny, the Aim Assist stat affects Bullet Magnetism, not Reticle Friction. And mouse has more AA/BM than controller.
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Here is video evidence (provided by Drewsky) that mouse has more aim assist (bullet magnetism), stability and accuracy than controller, while controller has reticle friction and mouse does not: https://youtu.be/qrJv7mj7Ab4?t=736

There is a common misconception, held by players and content creators alike, that controller has more aim assist than mouse. This is driven by messy semantics – what do they mean by aim assist? In Destiny, the Aim Assist stat (hidden in game, but visible on third party apps) governs the size of your aim assist cone: the area in which a bullet will be curved toward the target. The larger that area, the more aim assist you have, and the more likely you will hit your target despite not being aimed precisely on it. In other words, the Aim Assist stat governs bullet magnetism.

The size of the aim assist cone can be seen in-game by looking at the crosshair. The structure varies by archetype, but for hand cannons the circle portion represents the aim assist cone. It grows as you add aim assist-boosting perks and mods, or change to weapons with higher aim assist stats. If you didn't bother watching the video, here's a simple text demonstration. On the left is the aim assist cone on mouse, on the right is controller: O o. This should be all you need to see to confirm my point: aim assist (bullet magnetism) is higher on mouse.

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Here is where the misconception stems from: Unlike in other games, aim assist in Destiny does NOT correspond to reticle friction/stickiness, which is the effect of your crosshair slowing down over a target. Most people use "aim assist" and "stickiness" interchangeably, but to do so for Destiny is misleading. Again, reticle friction is only present on controller (because it's harder to aim with thumbsticks), which many consider a huge advantage. But it is not affected in any way by the aim assist stat. It is set to a flat strength for each sub-archetype. Two weapons of the same sub-archetype with different aim assist stats will have the exact same amount of reticle friction.

Therefore, we need to stop using the term "aim assist" to describe reticle friction. Doing so has led to the misconception that controller has more aim assist (bullet magnetism) than mouse, when the opposite is true. It causes people to gloss over or never realize that mouse has considerably more bullet magnetism, which is a big deal.

You may be of the opinion that reticle friction is more important than bullet magnetism and that's fine, we all have opinions. But to say that "controller has more aim assist" is not an opinion, it is an error. Since for Destiny, aim assist = bullet magnetism, to say that "mouse has more aim assist" is not an opinion, it is a fact. If we are going to share opinions about what input is better, we need to at least get on the same page about the facts of the game's mechanics. And that is what I am attempting to do with this thread. If you downvote it because of your opinion (note that I never shared my own opinions, only facts), you are going against truth and impeding productive discourse. Which is par for the course in society these days, so I shouldn't expect much more. Fingers crossed though.

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